Tax Protestors: Keep your Distance

Tax protestors typically turn to a handful of “canned” arguments regarding the government’s lack of authority to levee taxes.  These arguments are typically not very successful.  When tax protestors refuse to pay taxes based on these flawed legal positions, they are typically hit with a barrage of penalties and interest on top of their tax debt, and some even do prison time.  But tax protestors who are also former IRS agents? — not very typical.

That’s what makes the story of Sherry Peel Jackson so interesting.  She worked for seven years as an IRS revenue agent, then she went into private practice as a CPA, then she spent four years in prison for failure to file tax returns, and now she tours around promoting the books she wrote in prison about the illegalities of income taxes.

Don’t believe anyone who tells you that taxes are illegal.  You will want to avoid these people like the plague.  The tax protestor groups are a sham and can cause you some serious tax problems.

DOJ Shuts Down “Redemption Theory” Tax Fraud Ring

This week the US Department of Justice released the names of seven individuals who have been charged in a $120 million tax fraud scheme. According to the indictment, the false return scheme was national in scope, causing the filing of tax returns for at least 180 clients from 30 different states, and requesting more than $120 million worth of fraudulent tax refunds. The indictment alleges that the defendants and clients of the scheme collectively filed more than 380 tax returns, mostly from tax year 2008, reporting the amount of their personal debt obligations as both income and as federal tax withholding.

Other reports mention the scammers were promulgating a “redemption theory.” Here’s the scoop on this bizarre tax protestor theory according to Wikipedia:

Redemption theory involves claims that when the U.S. government abandoned the gold standard in 1933, the government pledged its citizens as collateral so that the government could borrow money. The movement also asserts that common citizens can gain access to funds in secret accounts using obscure procedures and regulations.

According to the theory, the government created a fictitious person (or “straw man”) corresponding to each newborn citizen with bank accounts initially holding $630,000. The theory further holds that through obscure procedures under the Uniform Commercial Code, a citizen can “reclaim” the straw man and write checks against its accounts.

The “straw man” argument is cited by the IRS as one of the 40 frivolous tax arguments which, if made, subjects the taxpayer to tougher penalties. The “straw man” argument is #18.